OLYMPIC PARK COALITION FOR RESPONSIBLE DEVELOPMENT

PR AND CROWDFUNDING

THE BACKGROUND

The Olympic Park Coalition for Responsible Development (OPCRD), unearthed three 'hidden' applications to build London’s largest concrete plant in the middle of the Olympic Park.

The site planned for 24 hour use 7 days a week, would see an extra 900 HGVs per day on the road, produce concrete dust and possibly asphalt fumes, both of which have proven to cause cancer, asthma, and other serious respiratory issues. 

The challenge was to create mass awareness and create a fundraising campaign so the OPCRD could take on the corporate heavyweights behind the applications and get the plans rejected.

opcrd map.jpg

THE BIG SOLUTION

We created an online petition via Change.org and a website revealing the details of the applications, a map outlining the proposed site location in relation to the Olympic Park, residential buildings, schools and universities and a link back to the petition.

 

We liaised with the press throughout the campaign writing and distributing press releases and contacted several political parties and local businesses including those due to move to the new International Quarter, Stratford.

We started a crowd funding page to raise money for a professional planning consultant to write and submit a formal objection letter as well as organising a fundraising event and addressing Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan at the London People's Question Time.

THE BIG RESULTS

11

pieces of media coverage

£3,000

raised

12.5k

campaign signatures

opcrd-press.jpg

​Coverage secured The London Evening Standard, Time Out, The Guardian, BBC Online, BBC London News (television broadcast), Newham Recorder and Hackney Citizen.

 

The campaign attracted the support from the Financial Conduct Authority who has moved 3,500 staff to the Olympic Park's new International Quarter.

 

Through press coverage, School 21 in Stratford got in touch with the OPCRD to ask if they could use maths to highlight how bad the pollution could be if this plan was to go ahead. Using the Gaussian Plume model, pupils were able to present to the London Legacy Development Corporation planning committee the detrimental effects the plans would have on local residents if they were to go ahead. 

 

Success! The plans for the concrete factories were unanimously rejected by the London Legacy Development Corporation planning committee.

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